The following unit is designed to be used in an intermediate Grade 4/5 class to address
the Aboriginal Cultures component of the Grade 4 Social Studies Curriculum.
The following Prescribed Learning Outcomes are addressed in this unit:

A1: Apply critical thinking skills ­ including comparing, imagining, inferring,
identifying patterns, and summarizing ­ to selected problems and issues
A2: Use maps and time lines to gather and represent information
A5: Create a presentation on a selected historical event or topic
B1: Distinguish characteristics of various Aboriginal cultures in BC and Canada
B3: Identify effects of early contact between Aboriginal societies and European
explorers and settlers
C1: Compare governance in Aboriginal cultures with governance in early
European settlements in BC and Canada
C2: Identify the impact of Canadian governance on Aboriginal people’s rights
D1: Compare bartering and monetary systems of exchange
D2: Describe technologies used by Aboriginal people in BC and Canada
D5: Describe economic and technological exchanges between explorers and
Aboriginal people
E1: Use maps and globes to locate
– the world’s hemispheres
– the world’s continents and oceans
– Aboriginal groups studied
E2: Identify the significance of selected place names in BC and Canada
E3: describe Aboriginal peoples’ relationship with the land and natural resources
To Note:  This unit is designed to provide teachers with an overview of how we taught
the unit (with changes based upon reflections of “what worked” or “didn’t”.)  Each
teacher will have to make their own changes based on the numerous factors impacting
their individual classrooms.

RESOURCES USED:
Silvey, Diane. From Time Immemorial: The First People of the Pacific
Northwest Coast. Gabriola: Pacific Edge Publishing Ltd, 2000.
MacKenzie, Jennette. Nelson Literacy 4C First Contact. Toronto: Nelson
Education Ltd, 2008.
The corresponding Explorers Unit addressed the following PLO’s:
A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, B2, D3, D4.  The Explorers Unit can also be found in the KELSET Learning Commons in the Teacher section on the Diversity WordPress site.

SECTION 1:  MAPPING, TIMELINE and ABORIGINAL INTRODUCTION
This section begins by reintroduces the students to the map of the world which they will have
already seen in previous grades.  The students will compare two versions of the World Map to
compare and contrast.  (One is a version with Europe in the center and the other has North
America in the center).  The students also completed the corresponding activity from the
Teachers guide on Map Grids.
From this point, we read the article from the Teacher’s Guide Human Life on North America
and complete the Timeline.  Next, teacher and students read page 1 and 2 of From Time
Immemorial.   We also used the opportunity to discuss nonfiction text features.  This introduction
also includes a map of the Pacific Northwest Coast Language Groups.

Big Idea:
First Nations Groups have been on North America for over 15 000 years and believe
they have been here since Time Immemorial.  They truly are the first nation on North America.
First Nations Groups are organized by language groups across the country.  Within
language groups, there are also individual bands.

RESOURCES USED:
Teacher’s Guide: From Time Immemorial
Page 14: World Map
Page 15: Continents and Oceans
Page 20: Human Life on North America
Page 21: Historical Timeline
Page 17: Looking Back at the Introduction
Page 18: First Nations Values

SECTION 2: ABORIGINAL PLACE NAMES IN BC AND CANADA
We wanted to include a section illustrating to the students the impact of First Nations on
Canadian and British Columbian Place Names.  This short section can be done in different
ways, however in the most basic form, the handouts from the book can be reviewed and the
second handout, Aboriginal Place Names can be completed.  This includes a map of BC where
students can then use an atlas as a reference to label the map of BC with the place names
provided in the hand out.  Aboriginal Place Names has two versions to help with the diversity in
the classroom.
Some classrooms could start this activity by giving the students a list of place names and the
students were asked to sort into either an aboriginal inspired name or non aboriginal name.  As
a class, the teacher will then lead a discussion on which names would be in which column.

Big Idea:
Many of Canadian and British Columbian place names are First Nation words or adapted
from First Nation words.

RESOURCES USED:
Aboriginal Place Names
Teachers Guide: From Time Immemorial
Page 140: Coastal Place Names
Page 141: Canadian Aboriginal Place Names
Page 142: Canadian Place Names Puzzle

SECTION 3: MODELING AND GUIDED PRACTICE
Reading and Note ­making from Chapter 2—Villages & Families: From Time Immemorial—The
First People of the Pacific Northwest
1)  As a class we read this chapter together (preview text features, discuss
connections/background knowledge, ask questions).
2) Section by section we unpacked the main ideas vs the details and students learned to take
notes in their own words being as clear and concise as possible. This is MODELED heavily and
done as a group using the document camera. See attached note taking template
3)  We also made use of the story “The Training of Tano” (page 6­7) to learn how and why
stories are used within aboriginal families.  This could be an extension activity. See attachment.
4)  Finally, we discussed the plus’s and minus’s of the involvement of the extended family in
raising children using the attached graphic organizer. This could be an extension activity.

SECTION 4: INDEPENDENT PRACTICE
Students select topic and research/note ­take
1)  Students select (or are assigned) a particular topic/chapter from the resource From Time
Immemorial. Using the attached graphic organizer they will follow the same process as in the
modelling section but are working either independently or with a partner/group of three.  There
are 10 potential topics from the resource.
2)  Since students will become experts on a different aspect of pre­-contact Aboriginal life in the
Pacific Northwest it will be their responsibility to teach the rest of the class what they know.
Each student will create a poster for our class gallery walk using the information they have
collected.  The following are student samples on various topics:

Warfare

Shelter

Hunting and Gathering

Gathering

Fishing

Art

It is extremely important to discuss and show features of good (and not so good) informational posters with students and share (or build) an evaluation rubric with students like the one attached.  Students
should/could also self­-evaluate on the rubric before the teacher.

3)  When  posters are complete or almost complete have each student complete the attachment
Poster Self-Reflection. This will prepare them for the gallery walk and help them to make
additions/improvements to their poster.

SECTION 5: GALLERY WALK ­ SHOW WHAT YOU KNOW!
1)  On Day 1 half of the class (1 poster on each different topic) will set up around the classroom.
The rest of the class will be the gallery walkers. With the attached organizer they will rotate in
set groups on the teacher’s command (approx. 3-­4 minutes at each poster) to the different
posters.  The poster maker will welcome them, share their poster and the 2+ most important
things they learned about their topic.
2) Repeat on Day 2 with the groups flipped so that everyone has had a chance to share their
poster and everyone has had a chance to be a gallery walker.

SECTION 6:  FOLLOW UP/ SOLIDIFYING BIG IDEAS AND INTRODUCING FIRST
CONTACT WITH EXPLORERS USING NELSON LITERACY 4C RESOURCE
1) Trappers and Traders with attachment pg 56
2) First Contact page 62 with attachment

SECTION 7: FURTHER EVALUATION IF NEEDED/REQUIRED
1) The Teacher’s Guide for From Time Immemorial  contains many extensions including a
“Looking Back at Chapter __” assignment that may be useful for evaluation

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